TEARS IN RAIN
Tears In Rain is the final speech of ROY BATTY, who is the REPLICANT leader of NEXUS 6 in the movie BLADE RUNNER. It is a classic and oft quoted line and has been
described as "perhaps the most moving death soliloquy in cinematic history". It was spoken by the actor Rutger Hauer, who perhaps made the best ever bad guy exit

"
I,VE SEEN THINGS YOU PEOPLE WOULD NOT BELIEVE. ATTACK SHIPS ON FIRE OFF THE SHOULDER OF ORION. I'VE
WATCHED C-BEAMS GLITTER IN THE DARK NEAR THE TANNHAUSER GATE. ALL THOSE MOMENTS WILL BE LOST IN
TIME.....LIKE.....TEARS.....IN RAIN.....TIME.....TO DIE"

This is a very clever piece that just shows that you can't judge a book by it's cover. This so called bad guy proves to his hunter, that despite being a droid that has been
created by man so advanced that it develop emotions and feelings he can show compassion even towards the person that has been hunting him. Even knowing that he
himself is at deaths door, he saves the life of the Blade Runner and in his closing words shows that Man is truly bad for denying them a life
He's sad because he's had all of these wonderful memories, but they mean nothing now. He's going to die soon so his memories and moments are just going to fade away,
lost in time. Like tears in rain.
Counter

Blade Runner is a genre-bending 1982 Science Fiction film starring Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos and Daryl Hannah, that borrows
stylistic elements from Film Noir and Hardboiled Detective fiction. Set in a dystopian near-future City Noir version of Los Angeles, it established much of the tone and flavor
of the Cyber Punk movement and the film style of Tech Noir. It is a highly intelligent film, visually stunning and features a seriously great script. The definitive high-def/Blu-
ray Director's Cut came out in 2007.

Deckard is a Blade Runner. His job is to "retire" renegade Replicants — rogue androids that are not supposed to be on Earth. Some of the most advanced replicants yet
have escaped, and Deckard is assigned to retire them. But they are so like normal humans that Deckard can't help but empathize with them, and he even falls for one.

Blade Runner was loosely based on the Philip K. Dick novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, with Dick's approval. The title itself comes from the novel The
Bladerunner by Alan E. Nourse*. Other than the title, the movie has nothing to do with The Bladerunner. It just sounded cool.

The film was a commercial failure upon release, but it later become a widely acknowledged classic that regularly appears on "Best Films Of All Time" lists.